Perceived Authenticity among CEOs

In a recent post by Marketingprofs suggests there are 5 phrases that CEOs use that signify  “BS.” the post goes at length to discuss how some CEOs are perceived as inauthentic. I find it hard to believe that any CEO for that matter can be inauthentic with their publics. If so, I can’t image they have much job security.

If a CEO is viewed as inauthentic, the public also believes they are incapable of developing a sense of trust among the public. In the corporate world, trust among the organizations publics is the single most important factor in organizational survival. The CEO serves as the face of the company and it is vital for them to maintain a positive public image.

The study results show the respondents believe CEOs and corporate executives are the least likely to be authentic were often viewed as “tone deaf.” All too often people look at CEOs as high-ranking corporate officials that are stuck in the “ivory tower.” These officials are often seen as out of touch with their publics.

Some of the more “authentic” CEOS included Ray Kroc, founder of Mcdonald’s and Steve Jobs.

The article also provided a list of phrases that are often associated with a lack of authenticity. This list included:

“This deal is a win-win.” When I heard this, I asked myself if there was such a thing as a “win-win” situation with the current economy

“Thinking/working/planning outside the box.” According to the poll, many bloggers feel this is standard corporate lingo and lacks creativity.

The survey also found there’s “something more authentic and relatable about a leader who can admit that mistakes were made.”- Jeff Levine, founder Gotham Research group.

Flckr Image by Dplanet

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About Pat Terwilliger

Senior at the University of Oregon. Communications major and a minor in Business Administration.
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